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            Tokyo 1964

            First in Asia

            The 1964 Tokyo Games were the first to be held in Asia. The carrier of the flame, Yoshinori Sakai, was chosen because he was born on 6 August 1945, the day the atomic bomb exploded in Hiroshima, in homage to the victims and as a call for world peace.

            Evolving technology

            A cinder running track was used for the last time in the athletics events, whilst a fibreglass pole was used for the first time in the pole vaulting competition. The Tokyo Games was also the last occasion that hand timing by stopwatch was used for official timing.

            Memorable champions

            Abebe Bikila of Ethiopia became the first athlete to win the marathon twice, whilst Soviet gymnast Larysa Latynina brought her career medal total to an incredible 18. It also proved fourth time lucky for Greco-Roman wrestler Imre Polyak, who finally won gold after finishing second in the same division at the previous three Olympic Games.

            Olympic spirit

            The first official Fair Play Trophy for setting an outstanding example of sportsmanship was awarded to Swedish yachtsmen Lars Gunnar Käll and Stig Lennart Käll. The Swedes gave up their race to come to the aid of two other competitors whose boat had sunk.

            NOCs: 93
            Athletes: 5,151 (678 women, 4,473 men)
            Events: 163
            Volunteers: n/a
            Media: n/a

            Homage and symbolism

            The carrier of the flame, Yoshinori Sakai, was chosen because he was born on 6 August 1945, the day the atomic bomb exploded in Hiroshima, in homage to the victims and as a call for peace in the world.

            Fair play rewarded

            Swedish yachtsmen Lars Gunnar Käll and Stig Lennart Käll were the first recipients of the Tokyo Trophy for setting an outstanding example of sportsmanship when they gave up their race to save the life of a fellow competitor.

            Honour to Japan

            Japan wanted to show the world its talent for organisation. It success earned it three awards from the International Olympic Committee- the Olympic Cup, the Bonacossa Trophy and the "Diploma of Merit".

            The end of a type of running track

            A cinder running track was used for the last time in the athletics events.

            The first time in Asia

            It was the first time the Olympic Games were given to an Asian country.

            New on the programme

            Appearance of two new sports- judo (men) and volleyball (men and women).

            A team sport for women

            The first appearance of a team sport for women- volleyball

            An innovation in pole vaulting

            The first time a fibreglass pole was used in the polevaulting competition.

            Ceremonies

            Official opening of the Games by:
            The Emperor Hirohito

            Lighting the Olympic Flame by:
            Yoshinori Sakaï, a student born on 6 August 1945, the day the atomic bomb exploded in Hiroshima

            Olympic Oath by:
            Takashi Ono (artistic gymnastics)

            Official Oath by: The officials' oath at an Olympic Summer Games was first sworn in 1972 in Munich.

            Tokyo 1964 Emblem

            It is composed of the Olympic rings superimposed on the emblem of the Japanese national flag, representing the rising sun. Having examined a large number of proposals, the Games Organising Committee chose the design submitted by Yusaku Kamekura which was subsequently accepted as the official emblem of the Games.

            Tokyo 1964 Medals

            On the obverse, the traditional goddess of victory, holding a palm in her left hand and a winner’s crown in her right. A design used since the 1928 Games in Amsterdam, created by Florentine artist Giuseppe Cassioli (ITA -1865-1942) and chosen after a competition organised by the International Olympic Committee in 1921.

            For these Games, the picture of victory is accompanied by the specific inscription: "XVIII OLYMPIAD TOKYO 1964". On the reverse, an Olympic champion carried in triumph by the crowd, with the Olympic stadium in the background.

            N.B: From 1928 to 1968, the medals for the Summer Games were identical. The Organising Committee for the Games in Munich in 1972 broke new ground by having a different reverse which was designed by a Bauhaus representative, Gerhard Marcks.

            More info
            Tokyo 1964 Torch

            Number of torchbearers: 100 603 (this high number is explained by the fact that in Japan, 1km was covered by the bearer of the flame, two reserve runners and up to 20 accompanying people)
            Total distance: 16 240 km outside Japan, 925 km in Japan
            Countries crossed: from Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Iran, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Okinawa (Under US administration) and Japan. Three routes and two others flames lit with the sacred one inside Japan

            More info
            Tokyo 1964 Poster

            It recalls the official emblem, composed of the Olympic rings superimposed on the emblem of the Japanese national flag, representing the rising sun. There was a total of four official posters, all designed by Yusaku Kamekura. They were all made by photoengraving using several colours, highlighting the technology of the Japanese printing industry. The posters themselves received a number of prizes for their excellence, including the Milan Prize for poster graphics. 100,000 copies were made.

            Tokyo 1964 Coins

            TOKYO 1964 : A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE

            With the Olympic Games, Japan needed to speak to a global audience.
            Looking for a way to transcend language – given the sui generis nature of the Japanese alphabet – Japanese graphic designers came up with an ingenious graphical system that was unique, clear and modern: pictograms!
            Tokyo 1964 proved to be something of a milestone, as each Games edition since then has given rise to its own pictograms.

            More info
            Tokyo 1964 Official Reports

            “The games of the XVIII Olympiad, Tokyo 1964: the official report of the Organizing Committee” was published in 1966 in three languages, French (for the first time since Amsterdam 1928), English and Japanese. It was composed of two volumes.





            • Tokyo 1964
              • Tokyo 1964

                12 Mar 2014 |
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                “The games of the XVIII Olympiad, Tokyo 1964: the official report of the Organizing Committee” was published in 1966 in three languages, French (for the first time since Amsterdam 1928), English and Japanese. It was composed of two volumes.

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            Gallery

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            Tokyo 1964-The delegations in the Olympic stadium: Japan (JPN).
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            Opening Ceremony Tokyo 1964

            Yoshinori Sakai, the last torchbearer, stands next to Greek actress Aleka Katseli at a rehearsal prior to the Opening Ceremony of the Tokyo Olympic Games

            ?Central-Press
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            Opening Ceremony Tokyo 1964

            Yoshinori Sakai has lit the Olympic cauldron

            ?IOC
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            Final Torchbearer (1)

            Yoshinori Sakai, who was born in Hiroshima on the day the first atomic bomb devastated the city, lights the Olympic flame in Tokyo's main stadium during the opening of the Olympic Games, 10th October 1964. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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            Final Torchbearer

            Yoshinori Sakai, who was born in Hiroshima on the day the first atomic bomb devastated the city, lights the Olympic flame in Tokyo's main stadium during the opening of the Olympic Games, 10th October 1964. (Photo by Ishi/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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            51 1964 Olympics Anton Geesink

            1964: Anton Geesink of the Netherlands holds down Akio Kaminaga of Japan shortly before winning the open judo category at the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Judo was included in the Olympic Games for the first time in Tokyo in 1964 and the host country, which invented the sport, swept up all the gold medals until the open category. Dutchman Geensik, who had been a dominant figure in the sport, triumphed and brought disappointment to the hosts. Geesink was a huge man, but had a nimbleness which belied his frame and skill with ankle taps which were crucial. He subsequently devoted himself to teaching and became an IOC member in 1987. Mandatory Credit: IOC/Allsport
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            天津快乐十分开奖结果查询

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